Beard, Makusha take top college track, field honors

December 15, 2011

College football has RG3.

Collegiate track and field has Jessica Beard and Ngoni Makusha.

Within a week of Baylor’s Robert Griffin III winning the Heisman Trophy as college football’s top player, Beard and Makusha have won The Bowerman — college track and field’s equivalent to the Heisman.

Beard, from Texas A&M, took women’s honors.

Makusha, from Florida State, won the men’s award.

Jessica Beard

Beard, who will graduate Saturday, won NCAA titles indoors and outdoors at 400 meters and the 4-by-400 relay. From Euclid, Ohio, she became the third women in NCAA history and first since 1999 to win both 400 and both 4-by-400 titles in the same year.

Beard clocked the world’s fastest time of the year indoors (50.79). Outdoors, she won the NCAA in 51.10 and had a 49.13 split as anchor of the Aggies’ relay. After the collegiate season, Beard placed fourth in the USATF Championships 400, running a season-best 51.06.

Ngoni Makusha

Makusha, from Seke, Zimbabwe, joins a list of 100 meters and long jump champions in the same NCAA Outdoor meet that includes Houston’s Carl Lewis, Ohio State’s Jesse Owens and Michigan’s DeHart Hubbard. The junior, who is passing on his senior season in order to turn pro, also won the NCAA Indoor long-jump title and is the first male to sweep the indoor and outdoor jump titles since Nebraska’s Arturs Abolins in 2006. Makusha won a third title outdoors, running the second leg on the Seminoles 4-by-100 relay. His winning time of 9.89 in the 100 broke the collegiate and meet record of 9.92 set by UCLA’s Ato Bolden, and also is the Zimbabwean national record. He also set a national record of 27-6 3/4 in the long jump.

The Bowerman award, named for legendary Oregon coach Bill Bowerman, was introduced in 2009. It is presented annually by the United States Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association.

The Bowerman winners

WOMEN                                                                                    MEN
Jenny Barringer,  Colo.               2009                 Galen Rupp, Oregon
Queen Harrison, Va. Tech         2010                  Ashton Eaton, Oregon
Jessica Beard, Texas A&M         2011                  Ngoni Makusha, Fla. St.

 


Bowerman lists down to 10 semifinalists

June 21, 2011

The women’s and men’s watch committees for The Bowerman have named the 10 semifinalists for collegiate track and field’s biggest award. The Bowerman, track and field’s version of what college football has in the Heisman Trophy, is presented in conjunction with the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association.

A 10-person Bowerman Advisory Board will trim the list to three finalists, to be named July 13 (men) and 14 (women).

Women’s semifinalists

Name, year, school, events, hometown
Nia Ali
, sr., Southern Cal, hurdles/jumps, Philadelphia
Brigetta Barrett, so., Arizona, jumps, Duncanville, Texas
Jessica Beard, sr., Texas A&M, sprints, Euclid, Ohio
Emma Coburn, jr., Colorado, distance, Crested Butte, Colo.
Kimberlyn Duncan, so., LSU, sprints, Katy, Texas
Jordan Hasay, so., Oregon, distance, Arroyo Grande, Calif.
Sheila Reid, jr., Villanova, distance, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada
Tina Sutej, jr., Arkansas, pole vault, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Jeneba Tarmoh, jr., Texas A&M, sprints, San Jose, Calif.
Brianne Theisen, sr., Oregon, combined events, Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada

Nia Ali

Nia Ali

Nia Ali Winner of the NCAA outdoor 100-meter hurdles with a wind-aided 12.63. Ali clocked a personal-best time of 12.77 to win Pac-10 title and is ranked seventh in the world in 2011. Finished sixth at the NCAA outdoor meet in the high jump; had a season best of 6-1¼ to finish second in the Pac-10 to Arizona’s Brigetta Barrett. Ali was also an NCAA qualifier indoors in the 60-meter hurdles.

Brigetta Barrett – Claimed NCAA high jump titles in both the indoor and outdoor seasons to join six others that have accomplished the feat (most recently, Texas’ Destinee Hooker in 2009). Barrett cleared six feet or more in each of her 11 competitions and notched an all-around personal best of 6-4 to win the Pac-10 title. Barrett won 10 of 11 meet crowns in the high jump during both indoor and outdoor seasons.

Jessica Beard

Jessica Beard

Jessica Beard – Became the third female in NCAA Division I history, and first since 1999, to win both 400 national titles in the same year and run on both winning 4-by-400 relays at the NCAA Indoor and NCAA Outdoor Championships. Beard, four-time Big 12 indoor 400-meter champ, recorded the world’s fastest 400 time indoors with a 50.79 clocking to win the national crown. Outdoors, Beard clocked 51.10 for the NCAA win and split 49.13 for the Aggies as anchor of the winning 4-by-400 relay.

Emma Coburn – Won the NCAA 3,000-meter steeplechase title in a wire-to-wire 9:41.14 and bettered the field by more than six seconds. Coburn was undefeated in the steeplechase during the season and clocked a 9:40.51 personal best to win the Payton Jordan Cardinal Invitational -– a mark that ranks sixth among collegians all-time. Coburn also finished eighth at the NCAA Indoor Championships in the mile.

Kimberlyn Duncan

Kimberlyn Duncan

Kimberlyn Duncan — Swept the NCAA 200-meter titles and, in both seasons, notched world-leading times. Duncan became the sixth woman in NCAA Division I history and the first since Auburn’s Kerron Stewart in 2007 to sweep 200-meter titles in the same season. Indoors, Duncan won the SEC title in 22.78 for the world’s best time of the season. Outdoors, Duncan was undefeated in the 200 and clocked a low-altitude collegiate record (and the third-best overall) with a 22.24 run. Duncan was also the NCAA 100-meter runner-up and anchored the Lady Tigers to an NCAA title in the 4-by-100 (42.64).

Jordan Hasay – Won NCAA indoor titles in the mile and 3,000 meters, becoming the fifth overall and the first since Northern Arizona’s Johanna Nilsson (2006) to claim such a double. Hasay also led the Ducks to a runner-up finish in the distance medley relay at the national indoor meet. Outdoors, Hasay finished fourth nationally in the 5,000 meters and eighth in the 1,500.

Sheila Reid

Sheila Reid

Sheila Reid – Tallied three NCAA crowns and five Big East titles during the 2011 seasons. Outdoors, Reid became the first woman in Division I history to win the NCAA 1,500 and 5,000 in the same championship. Indoors, Reid anchored the Wildcats to the NCAA crown in the distance medley relay and was second nationally in the 3,000 meters. In the Big East, Reid won the 1,500-5,000 double outdoors and was a three-time titlist indoors with wins in the 1,000 meters, 4-by-800 and DMR.

Tina Sutej

Tina Sutej

Tina Sutej – Set collegiate records indoors and outdoors. Indoors, Sutej vaulted a best of 14-10¾ to set the all-time collegiate best in winning the SEC crown and went on to win the NCAA title. Outdoors, Sutej again won the SEC league title with a collegiate-record vault – a clearance of 15-1½. Overall, Sutej collected 13 straight meet victories before finishing runner-up at the NCAA outdoor meet, but tied the championship-meet record with Oregon’s Melissa Gergel, who took the crown on virtue of misses.

Jeneba Tarmoh

Jeneba Tarmoh

Jeneba Tarmoh Was twice the NCAA’s runner-up in the 200 meters, matching performances both indoors and outdoors. Tarmoh won NCAA titles indoors and outdoors on the Aggie 4-by-400-meter relays and collected another silver as a member of the 4-by-100 squad. Tarmoh recorded top-five world times both indoors and outdoors in the 200, running 22.34 in the national finals to move into the collegiate all-time top 10 in the event. Tarmoh swept Big 12 outdoor 100- and 200-meter sprint titles and was on Texas A&M’s winning 4-by-100 relay.

Brianne Theisen – Twice set the collegiate record in the pentathlon during the indoor season and won her second straight NCAA crown in the event. Her score of 4,540 bettered her previous all-time collegiate best mark of 4,507, set in January at the UW (Washington) Invitational and ranked among the world’s top five in the event for the season. Theisen also scored at the NCAA indoor meet for the second straight year as a member of Oregon’s 4-by-400 relay team. Outdoors, Theisen did not compete as a result of injury.

Men’s semifinalists

Name, year, school, events, hometown
Jeshua Anderson
, sr., Washington State, hurdles, Woodland Hills, Calif.
Robby Andrews, so., Virginia, distance, Englishtown, N.J.
Sam Chelanga, sr., Liberty, distance, Nairobi, Kenya
Will Claye, jr., Florida, jumps, Phoenix
Kirani James, so., Alabama, sprints, Gouyave, Grenada
Leonard Korir, jr., Iona, distance, Iten, Kenya
Ngoni Makusha, jr., Florida State, jumps/sprints, Zimbabwe
Maurice Mitchell, jr., Florida State, sprints, Kansas City, Mo.
Scott Roth, sr., Washington, pole vault, Granite Bay, Calif.
Christian Taylor, jr., Florida, jumps, Fayetteville, Ga.

Jeshua Anderson

Jeshua Anderson

Jeshua Anderson Joined Brigham Young’s (and former University of Kentucky faculty member) Ralph Mann (1969-70-71) and Iowa State’s Danny Harris (1984-85-86) as the only three to win a third NCAA-championship title in the 400-meter hurdles. Won the title in 48.56, over a half-second ahead of the rest of the field. Earned the season’s collegiate best, and current American-leading, 400-hurdle time of 48.13 in winning a fourth-straight Pac-10 crown. Clocking also ranks second in the world so far in 2011 and ranks among the collegiate all-time top five.

Robby Andrews

Robby Andrews

Robby Andrews – Won his first NCAA outdoor 800-meter title with a memorable, come-from-behind 200-meter sprint to the finish. Sitting in last place at the 600-meter mark, Andrews used a 26.44-second final 200 to pass the field and grab the win from UC Irvine’s Charles Jock by only four hundredths of a second. Final time at the NCAA meet of 1:44.71 equaled the best collegiate and current best American mark of the year (Cory Primm, UCLA). 

Sam Chelanga

Sam Chelanga

Sam Chelanga – NCAA champion outdoors in the 5,000 meters and national runner-up indoors in the 5K and outdoors in the 10K. His title  in the 5K was won in a season’s best time of 13:29.30 which included a 58.15 final-lap split. Recorded the collegiate-season’s best 7:48.24 indoors in the 3,000 meters at the professional-laden New Balance Games in Boston in February.

Will Claye

Will Claye

Will Claye – Claimed the NCAA indoor national championship in the triple jump and was the nation’s runner-up indoors in the long jump and outdoors in the triple. Also finished third outdoors in the long jump. Outdoors, notched SEC victories in both horizontal jumps, the first to do so since 2004. Wind-legal performances during the outdoor season of 27-2½ and 56-11¼ are among the world’s top five in 2011. Wind-aided triple jump of 57-9¾ at the NCAA outdoor meet is the third-best all-conditions collegiate mark of all time.

Kirani James

Kirani James

Kirani James Claimed NCAA outdoor title in the 400 meters for the second straight year, becoming the first back-to-back titlist in the event since Auburn’s Avard Moncur in 2000 and 2001. Swept SEC crowns in the 400 with indoor and outdoor wins and recorded an all-time world junior indoor best with a 44.80 clocking in taking the league’s indoor crown in February. Clocked 44.6 split as the second leg of Grenada’s 4-by-400-relay team that finished third in the USA vs. The World race at the Penn Relays.

Leonard Korir –Indoor 5,000-meter and outdoor 10,000-meter NCAA champion. Split a 56.18 final lap to claim the outdoor national title. Also finished third outdoors nationally in the 5,000 and sixth indoors at 3,000. In clocking 27:29.40 in the 10K at Stanford’s Payton Jordan Invitational in May, he moved to second all-time in collegiate history in the event (Sam Chelanga, 27:08.39, 2010).

Ngoni Makusha

Ngoni Makusha

Ngoni Makusha — Won NCAA outdoor titles in the 100 meters and long jump, joining Carl Lewis, Jesse Owens, and Michigan’s DeHart Hubbard as the fourth man in NCAA Division I history to claim such a double at a single championship. Also claimed NCAA long jump title during the indoor season, becoming the first since 2006 to sweep the event’s two titles (Arturs Abolins, Nebraska, 2006). Notched a third NCAA title as second leg of 4-by-100-meter relay. Run of 9.89 in the NCAA 100-meter final broke the 1996 collegiate- and championship-meet record of 9.92 set in 1996 by UCLA’s Ato Bolden. Clocked 9.97 to win ACC crown and swept league titles in the long jump. Season’s best in the long jump and 100 meters rank amongst the world’s top five this year.

Maurice Mitchell NCAA outdoor 200-meter champion in a wind-aided 19.99 and third leg of Florida State’s national champion 4-by-100-meter relay team. Was national runner-up indoors in the 200 and was only bested by Oklahoma’s Mookie Salaam who took the title by two thousandths of a second in a different section. Placed third at the NCAA meet indoors in the 60 and outdoors in the 100 meters. Did not lose a 200-meter race in 13 tries during the indoor and outdoor seasons.

Scott Roth Claimed a sweep of NCAA pole vault crowns during the year, becoming the fourth to do so since 2000. Marked indoor personal best of 18-1 during the indoor season and an overall personal best of 18-9¼ to take victory at the Mt. SAC Relays. At the end of the collegiate season, season’s best mark ranked among the world’s top five.

Christian Taylor

Christian Taylor

Christian Taylor – Winner of the NCAA outdoor triple jump title with an all-time, all-conditions collegiate best mark of 58-4¾. The wind-aided title clincher came on the final attempt of a back-and-forth battle with teammate Will Claye. Marked wind-legal 57-1 in the competition’s fourth round to claim the season’s collegiate best mark and current American-leading mark. Finished second nationally indoors to Claye in the triple jump and qualified for both meets in the long jump. With Florida’s 4-by-100- and 4-by-400-meter relay teams, qualified for the national finals in both events outdoors. At Penn Relays, 4-by-100 squad finished second in the Championship of America race.

 

 


Conley, Myricks give track camp 13 Olympians

June 2, 2011

Horizontal-jump specialists Mike Conley and Larry Myricks have been added to the Maximum Velocity Track and Field Academy staff, bringing the total of Olympian instructors to 13 for a camp that runs Sunday through Wednesday at Centre College.

Jackie Joyner-Kersee, left, put hurdlers Christina Heilman and Nealy Williams through a drill at last year's camp. (Maloney photo)

Jackie Joyner-Kersee, left, put hurdlers Christina Heilman and Nealy Williams through a drill at last year's camp. (Maloney photo)

Both Conley and Myricks are members of the USA Track & Field Hall of Fame.

The camp, for boys and girls ages 12-19, will feature instruction in sprints and starting blocks, middle- and long-distance, hurdles, jumps, throws, pole vault, relays, sports nutrition and weight training. Cost is $400 for overnight campers, $315 for commuters and $200 for commuter coaches or parents.

Also, fans can check out the Olympians. Admission is $10 for adults, $5 for children (no charge for children under 5). The camp is in session from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., with a lunch break from noon until 12:45 p.m., through Tuesday. Wednesday will have a half-day session. Most of the Olympians will be on site through Tuesday only.

Conley may be the top combination long- and triple-jumper of all time. He ranked in the (annual) top 10 in the world in the long jump 10 times, and in the triple jump 14 times. The University of Arkansas product won the Olympic silver medal in the triple jump at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and improved to gold at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics. He also was a five-time member of Team USA at the World Outdoor Championships, winning a long-jump bronze medal in 1983, triple-jump silver in 1987, triple-jump bronze in 1991 and triple-jump gold in 1993. Indoors, he was the world record-holder in the triple jump and won World Championships in the triple jump in 1987 and 1989, also taking a long-jump bronze in 1989.

Myricks is best remembered for his long-jump battles with Carl Lewis. Out of Mississippi College, Myricks won the 1976 NCAA title and placed second at the U.S. Olympic Trials. At the Montreal Olympics, he qualified for the finals, but then broke his foot while taking a warmup jump. He went on to make the U.S. Olympic teams in 1980 (the boycotted Moscow Games), 1984 (Los Angeles) and 1988 (Seoul), winning a bronze medal in the latter. His personal best is 28-8 1/4. He earned 14 world rankings in the long jump and twice was ranked nationally in the 200 meters, where his best time was 20.03.

In addition to Conley and Myricks, the second-year camp staff includes:

Lexington’s Sharrieffa Barksdale (1984 Olympics, 400-meter hurdles)
Jackie Joyner-Kersee (1984, ’88, ’92, ’96 Olympics, heptathlon/long jump)
Lexington’s Tyson Gay (2008 Olympics, 100 meters, 4-by-100 relay)
Former UK athlete Dwight Phillips (2000, ’04 Olympics, long jump)
Johnny Gray (1984, ’88, ’92, ’96 Olympics, 800 meters)
Jeff Hartwig (1996, 2008 Olympics, pole vault)
Kristin Heaston (2004, ’08 Olympics, shot put)
Aretha Hill-Thurmond (1996, 2004, ’08 Olympics, discus)
Bershawn Jackson (2008 Olympics, 400-meter hurdles)
Francie Larrieu-Smith (1972, ’76, ’80, ’88, ’92 Olympics, 1,500 and 10,000 meters, marathon)
Jamie Nieto (2004 Olympics, high jump)
Angela Taylor (former hurdler and heptathlete, head coach of U.S. Women’s Pan American Games team)